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Hi
I am comfortable with control table and aspect sequence chart but I find theory questions bit difficult.Please help me how to approach and prepare for theory questions. If I go through previous year questions and reviews on it, will it be sufficient for passing 1 theory question?
Thank you
A good written answer
1) answers the question, the whole question, and doesn't stray too far from the question;
2) is clearly structured and concisely written;
3) Takes account of how many marks are available for each part;
4) uses diagrams, tables etc to aid explanation/understanding.

You're leaving it very late for this year but I suggest doing past paper attempts and asking someone to comment on them. In my preparation I ensured I could attempt 4+ written questions in each year's paper as I didn't know what would come up.

Think about how you're going to use the reading time to choose which questions to tackle. This is your chance to read them very carefully. I found that there were several questions that looked good, but that was really only the first part - the second/third parts would have left me floundering so watch out for this.

For a question such as "List key advantages and disadvantages of axle counters and track circuits for train detection" how many marks are there? Aim to state that many advantages/disadvantages spread evenly between the options given.

Also think about exam technique - once you're picking up a pen in the exam. Is it worth jotting down anything that you're thinking of on a scrap paper, then briefly structuring your answer before you start writing it properly? Remember you have to aim to gain a mark a minute on average. This means writing concisely, and there is no time to add much of indirect relevance to the question.

There's often questions about risks, hazards, consequences, mitigation and/or advantages, disadvantages. Have a look at some past questions and think about how these might be presented - they're the type of thing that might go into a table (you could use the A3 paper instead of A4 lined paper)
Additionally, it's worth looking at this document I got from PJW. It will help you "translate" what a question is asking.

Examiners are very careful about how they phrase questions, but if you're unsure about how to interpret it state what you are assuming.

Afterthought: at the start of every answer state what railway's practice you're using. e.g. UK Mainline
Whilst it is not the case with all of the written questions there is a generally a "story" leading up to the final part. Sometimes there may be two narratives weaved together (part 1 is one theme, part 2 on another and then part 3 brings them together), sometimes it is just a logical progression.
It makes it REALLY important to read the whole question and see whether the last part might guide your thinking for the early parts. Occasionally people dive in and then when they get to the third or fourth part find themselves stuck!
Hi Dorothy, Is there any chance you could find the attached document again and repost, the link no longer works.RegardsTommy Wrote:dorothy.pipet
Additionally, it's worth looking at this document I got from PJW. It will help you "translate" what a question is asking.

Examiners are very careful about how they phrase questions, but if you're unsure about how to interpret it state what you are assuming.

Afterthought: at the start of every answer state what railway's practice you're using. e.g. UK Mainline
I think this is the one
Thank youdorothy.pipet Wrote:I think this is the one