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Study Pack
#21
Does study pack cover all items in reading list?
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#22
(02-11-2016, 03:55 PM)ericyang_thx Wrote: Does study pack cover all items in reading list?

The Study Pack is now a bit of an outdated name which has its ancestory in the days that a student could purchase a "pack"of physical paper copies of relevant documents.

For many years the formal name is "Study Guide" (although I accept that colloquially the old name is often perpetuated). These new ones will, I am sure, be covering all elements of the SYLLABUS.  It is an overview of how a student should interpret the items on the syllabus and give some discussion, examples and activities to help a student prepare for the exam.  They are certainly not a "text book" containing all you need to know for the exam.  Perhaps the old Mod 2 Study Pack that I originally produced went a long way down that road, but that is why the new one has been produced to be in line with those for other modules.

The READING LIST gives a range of supporting documents that it is recommended that a student studies in order to gain a wider and deeper understanding of the topics covered that relate to one or more topics which are in the syllabus for that module.
The Study Guide will point to such sources as suggested further reading.  These won't have been written with the IRSE exam specifically in mind and may not always even be specifically rail industry related, but there will always be some relevance that can give further insight in more detail to one or more elements. 

Hence if your question meant to ask: do I need to look wider than just the actual contents of the Study Guide? 
then the answer must be "probably".  
It does of course depend upon what you already know.  
If you work through the Study Guide and then feel that 
it was a good refresher but you didn't actually learn anything new, 
you had no difficulty in undertaking the activities and 
you could provide examples to "put flesh on the bones" of what the guide covered at high level, 
then you seem to have enough background knowledge and experience that extending your reading may not be essential and exam preparation can then move on to the phase of writing answers to past paper questions.  

If however the Study Guide alludes to things with which you are not already familiar, then that is a hint that you ought to expand your knowledge base and therefore the Reading List is likely to be a good source of suggestions for you to explore further.
PJW
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#23
(02-11-2016, 06:16 PM)PJW Wrote:
(02-11-2016, 03:55 PM)ericyang_thx Wrote: Does study pack cover all items in reading list?

The Study Pack is now a bit of an outdated name which has its ancestory in the days that a student could purchase a "pack"of physical paper copies of relevant documents.

For many years the formal name is "Study Guide" (although I accept that colloquially the old name is often perpetuated). These new ones will, I am sure, be covering all elements of the SYLLABUS.  It is an overview of how a student should interpret the items on the syllabus and give some discussion, examples and activities to help a student prepare for the exam.  They are certainly not a "text book" containing all you need to know for the exam.  Perhaps the old Mod 2 Study Pack that I originally produced went a long way down that road, but that is why the new one has been produced to be in line with those for other modules.

The READING LIST gives a range of supporting documents that it is recommended that a student studies in order to gain a wider and deeper understanding of the topics covered that relate to one or more topics which are in the syllabus for that module.
The Study Guide will point to such sources as suggested further reading.  These won't have been written with the IRSE exam specifically in mind and may not always even be specifically rail industry related, but there will always be some relevance that can give further insight in more detail to one or more elements. 

Hence if your question meant to ask: do I need to look wider than just the actual contents of the Study Guide? 
then the answer must be "probably".  
It does of course depend upon what you already know.  
If you work through the Study Guide and then feel that 
it was a good refresher but you didn't actually learn anything new, 
you had no difficulty in undertaking the activities and 
you could provide examples to "put flesh on the bones" of what the guide covered at high level, 
then you seem to have enough background knowledge and experience that extending your reading may not be essential and exam preparation can then move on to the phase of writing answers to past paper questions.  

If however the Study Guide alludes to things with which you are not already familiar, then that is a hint that you ought to expand your knowledge base and therefore the Reading List is likely to be a good source of suggestions for you to explore further.

Thank you for your reply.

After I studied IRSE "Study Guide for Module 2", there are some "Recommended reading" which refer to "Student Resource Study Pack" mention in a Module 2 Reading list.

Now, I just feel like that I have to finish a puzzle but those pieces are not in a same box, they scattered everywhere...

Is it a better practice that I should be a IRSE paid member as soon as possible to gather more information from the same source (e.g. Exam model answer)?
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#24
Yes. you should join the IRSE and then you will be able to sign up to access to the study guides, past papers, reading lists and so on on the IRSE website.
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#25
(23-11-2016, 03:55 PM)dorothy.pipet Wrote: Yes. you should join the IRSE and then you will be able to sign up to access to the study guides, past papers, reading lists and so on on the IRSE website.

Definitely agree, but please don't think that you only have to refer to one "textbook" of any sort to prepare for an exam module. The Study Guides give a high level overview of all the syllabus, but you do need to reference other sources to give greater understanding of detail- hence the Reading List to suggest some potentially useful items.  However candidates should generally answer questions in the context of the railway with which they are most familiar and therefore "local" material specifically written for a project, or defining maintenance procedure etc. can be an excellent source, unknown to the IRSE.  It is really all about gaining a wide experience and whereas there is nothing quite like "actually doing it yourself", reading about it is a good 2nd best and ensures you have a far broader exposure than you could hope to acquire directly until you have spent half a lifetime in the industry.
PJW
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#26
(23-11-2016, 08:08 PM)PJW Wrote:
(23-11-2016, 03:55 PM)dorothy.pipet Wrote: Yes. you should join the IRSE and then you will be able to sign up to access to the study guides, past papers, reading lists and so on on the IRSE website.

Definitely agree, but please don't think that you only have to refer to one "textbook" of any sort to prepare for an exam module. The Study Guides give a high level overview of all the syllabus, but you do need to reference other sources to give greater understanding of detail- hence the Reading List to suggest some potentially useful items.  However candidates should generally answer questions in the context of the railway with which they are most familiar and therefore "local" material specifically written for a project, or defining maintenance procedure etc. can be an excellent source, unknown to the IRSE.  It is really all about gaining a wide experience and whereas there is nothing quite like "actually doing it yourself", reading about it is a good 2nd best and ensures you have a far broader exposure than you could hope to acquire directly until you have spent half a lifetime in the industry.

Thank you your reply.

I feel quite confused when "which you are familiar" shows up in study guide.

Actually, I am not working with a "conventional" signalling system, as some of the parts is hidden or computerized. For example: "Route" is set by "Computer Based Interlocking (CBI)" on the basis of "Automatic Train Supervisor System (ATSS)" command; "Automatic Train Operation (ATO)" receives lineside data such as Track circuit and point status through Data Link Module which connected to CBI and these data will be transmitted to Vehicle On board Computer(VOBC). VOBC calculates "Target Speed" to control the speed of train automatically.

Therefore, signal aspect is not that important only red (stop) and blue (proceed) is employed, as train can operate automatically by VOBC. Headway can be adjusted according to timetable in ATSS by changing dwell time and target speed. I am afraid there is no such thing called "overlaps" as a train can stops 50 meters before an occupied track circuit.

That is not possible to answer those question by "Computers do that for me."

So, I am looking for a source (no matter text books, notes, DVD...) explain how conventional signalling system can handle those situation step by step. If there is no such things then I think I better do more past papers.
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#27
(24-11-2016, 10:58 AM)ericyang_thx Wrote:
(23-11-2016, 08:08 PM)PJW Wrote:
(23-11-2016, 03:55 PM)dorothy.pipet Wrote: Yes. you should join the IRSE and then you will be able to sign up to access to the study guides, past papers, reading lists and so on on the IRSE website.

Definitely agree, but please don't think that you only have to refer to one "textbook" of any sort to prepare for an exam module. The Study Guides give a high level overview of all the syllabus, but you do need to reference other sources to give greater understanding of detail- hence the Reading List to suggest some potentially useful items.  However candidates should generally answer questions in the context of the railway with which they are most familiar and therefore "local" material specifically written for a project, or defining maintenance procedure etc. can be an excellent source, unknown to the IRSE.  It is really all about gaining a wide experience and whereas there is nothing quite like "actually doing it yourself", reading about it is a good 2nd best and ensures you have a far broader exposure than you could hope to acquire directly until you have spent half a lifetime in the industry.

Thank you your reply.

I feel quite confused when "which you are familiar" shows up in study guide.

Actually, I am not working with a "conventional" signalling system, as some of the parts is hidden or computerized. For example: "Route" is set by "Computer Based Interlocking (CBI)" on the basis of "Automatic Train Supervisor System (ATSS)" command; "Automatic Train Operation (ATO)" receives lineside data such as Track circuit and point status through Data Link Module which connected to CBI and these data will be transmitted to Vehicle On board Computer(VOBC). VOBC calculates "Target Speed" to control the speed of train automatically.

Therefore, signal aspect is not that important only red (stop) and blue (proceed) is employed, as train can operate automatically by VOBC. Headway can be adjusted according to timetable in ATSS by changing dwell time and target speed. I am afraid there is no such thing called "overlaps" as a train can stops 50 meters before an occupied track circuit.

That is not possible to answer those question by "Computers do that for me."

So, I am looking for a source (no matter text books, notes, DVD...) explain how conventional signalling system can handle those situation step by step. If there is no such things then I think I better do more past papers.
The exam is equally applicable to any form of signalling.
This was what I was trying to explain; if your work entails transmission based signalling then ther is little value reading lots of stuff about lineside signalling.  However you do need to educate yourself about the WHOLE SYSTEM.  The fact that it is computerised does not change this; someone had to programme that computer.  The actual details of the inner workings of them may only be known to the very few developers but the concepts and the input/ output interfaces should be known to those working on other elements of the system- this is what the Exam is encouraging you to explore !
PJW
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#28
Hello Guys, Could anyone lead me to the correct way to prepare for module C ?
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