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Summary of Network Rail Vehicular Protected & Unprotected Crossings
#1
Hello PJW,

Hope you are fine.  Its the time of year when those taking the Module 2 exams need the revision and practice hence the visit to the forum.

Appended please find the summary comparing ABCL, AOCL, AHBC and MCB which I had submitted to you in late May this year for your comments.  Thank you for your valued comments and for the benefit of others taking the module 2 exams I would like to post them here complete with your comments on my summary.

Level crossings are included in almost every other year if not every year.

From the ORR Guide that I reviewed, AOCL is not favoured by Network Rail for new crossings and so for the exams if we are signalling to UK mainline practice, AOCL need not be considered as an option.  Please correct me if I am wrong to come to this conclusion.

My one question on your comments on the ABCL is that how will the SIP be determined without the 27 sec rule which you deleted?

Hope this summary is useful to all.

Cheers

Alex


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.doc   Summary_of_Level_Crossings_23_May_12_PJW[1].doc (Size: 82.5 KB / Downloads: 72)
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.pdf   Summary of Level Crossings_23_May_12.pdf (Size: 130.54 KB / Downloads: 2)
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#2
You are correct- It would be very surprising if NR were to comision any new AOCL; further I would anticipate existing ones would probably be converted when major renewal needed.

An ABCL should be providing a white flashing light for the rail driver prior to the time that the train arrives at the commencement of the crossing speed restriction- these boards are positionrd such that there is braking distance from the signed speed to a stop before reaching the roadway. So you first need to decide what that speed is to be (depends on crossing inter-visibility). Then you need to position the strike-in so that a train approaching at line speed and then braking to comply with the crossing speed will give the crossing enough time to operate- that means the 3 secs of yellow, then the 8secs of flashing red until the time that the barriers will be called down, because it is at that time that the DCI would start flashing white. Therefore it is a series of calculations- the important thing is to realise that we are seeking here to ensure that the train is not delayed waiting for the crossing; very different than for AHBC where the traiin will be going over that road at the maximum linespeed no mater what, so the crossing simply must close the road sufficientlly prior that the road user isn't there!



(26-08-2012, 09:51 AM)alexgoei Wrote: Hello PJW,

Hope you are fine. Its the time of year when those taking the Module 2 exams need the revision and practice hence the visit to the forum.

Appended please find the summary comparing ABCL, AOCL, AHBC and MCB which I had submitted to you in late May this year for your comments. Thank you for your valued comments and for the benefit of others taking the module 2 exams I would like to post them here complete with your comments on my summary.

Level crossings are included in almost every other year if not every year.

From the ORR Guide that I reviewed, AOCL is not favoured by Network Rail for new crossings and so for the exams if we are signalling to UK mainline practice, AOCL need not be considered as an option. Please correct me if I am wrong to come to this conclusion.

My one question on your comments on the ABCL is that how will the SIP be determined without the 27 sec rule which you deleted?

Hope this summary is useful to all.

Cheers

Alex
PJW
Reply
#3
(26-08-2012, 06:53 PM)PJW Wrote: You are correct- It would be very surprising if NR were to comision any new AOCL; further I would anticipate existing ones would probably be converted when major renewal needed.

An ABCL should be providing a white flashing light for the rail driver prior to the time that the train arrives at the commencement of the crossing speed restriction- these boards are positionrd such that there is braking distance from the signed speed to a stop before reaching the roadway. So you first need to decide what that speed is to be (depends on crossing inter-visibility). Then you need to position the strike-in so that a train approaching at line speed and then braking to comply with the crossing speed will give the crossing enough time to operate- that means the 3 secs of yellow, then the 8secs of flashing red until the time that the barriers will be called down, because it is at that time that the DCI would start flashing white. Therefore it is a series of calculations- the important thing is to realise that we are seeking here to ensure that the train is not delayed waiting for the crossing; very different than for AHBC where the traiin will be going over that road at the maximum linespeed no mater what, so the crossing simply must close the road sufficientlly prior that the road user isn't there!



(26-08-2012, 09:51 AM)alexgoei Wrote: Hello PJW,

Hope you are fine. Its the time of year when those taking the Module 2 exams need the revision and practice hence the visit to the forum.

Appended please find the summary comparing ABCL, AOCL, AHBC and MCB which I had submitted to you in late May this year for your comments. Thank you for your valued comments and for the benefit of others taking the module 2 exams I would like to post them here complete with your comments on my summary.

Level crossings are included in almost every other year if not every year.

From the ORR Guide that I reviewed, AOCL is not favoured by Network Rail for new crossings and so for the exams if we are signalling to UK mainline practice, AOCL need not be considered as an option. Please correct me if I am wrong to come to this conclusion.

My one question on your comments on the ABCL is that how will the SIP be determined without the 27 sec rule which you deleted?

Hope this summary is useful to all.

Cheers

Alex

Hello PJW,

Thanks for your ever so quick response.

I would like to test if my understanding is correct by putting forward the following arguements:

1 Because a ABCL is almost identical to the AHBC (as far as motorists are concerned and this seems to be covered by the literature I have read), there does appear to be a requirement for trains not to arrive earlier than 27 secs at the level crossing.

2 As the person monitoring the correct operation of the crossing equipment is the driver and he must be able to see the crossing, DLCI from the SSRB (which must not be more than 600 metres from the DLCI in case any of the crossing equipment is not working),

this will in turn determine the crossing speed so that if all goes well he should arrive the crossing no less than 27 secs.

Am I correct?

Cheers

Alex
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#4
(29-08-2012, 05:30 PM)alexgoei Wrote: I would like to test if my understanding is correct by putting forward the following arguments:

1 Because a ABCL is almost identical to the AHBC (as far as motorists are concerned and this seems to be covered by the literature I have read), there does appear to be a requirement for trains not to arrive earlier than 27 secs at the level crossing.

2 As the person monitoring the correct operation of the crossing equipment is the driver and he must be able to see the crossing, DLCI from the SSRB (which must not be more than 600 metres from the DLCI in case any of the crossing equipment is not working),

this will in turn determine the crossing speed so that if all goes well he should arrive the crossing no less than 27 secs.

Am I correct?
Cheers
Alex

Certainly correct in that the ABCL is very similar in presentation to the motorist as an AHBC.
Also correct re method of operation of the crossing.
Also correct that the position of the SSRB is determined from the visibility constraint and that itself determines the crossing speed to the value for which there is sufficient distance to brake to a stand prior to the road.
Therefore I do not disagree with your argument, but the calculation does differ from the "27secs at linespeed" used for the AHBC (ignoring the other allowances for speedo error, equipment response time, skewness of crossing etc).
PJW
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#5
With the 27 seconds, don't forget to add calculation/processing times onto that figure. Not all systems can identify an event happens instantaneously!
Le coureur
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