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Module Marking
#1
This one is probably for Peter to answer but I'm putting it up here in case someone else is in the know.

Just heard a little rumour that (not just for Module 3) all sections of all questions answered must be passed for an overall exam pass? So good marks in 2 out of 3 questions would not be good enough if the third is poor.

Could anyone confirm or deny such rumours?

Neil
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#2
nthomso3 Wrote:This one is probably for Peter to answer but I'm putting it up here in case someone else is in the know.

Just heard a little rumour that (not just for Module 3) all sections of all questions answered must be passed for an overall exam pass? So good marks in 2 out of 3 questions would not be good enough if the third is poor.

Could anyone confirm or deny such rumours?

Neil

I don't actually know but I would guess that if you did two fantastic answers and got say 20/25 then that would be 40/75 and thus being over 50% then you'd pass. However I think in the marking that the "law of diminishiing returns" applies and that getting 10 is reasonably easy, getting 15 is not too difficult but getting 20 is really very hard going and the chances of being able to do so in two questions really quite low.

Couple with this that if you end up scoring in the range 45-50 range then the examiners state that they try really hard to argue for a pass and see whether they could not give just a little bit more "benefit of the doubt" / view what you had put in a more generous light and see whether they can scrape together the few extra marks that would take you over the threshold. I don't think they'd even try to do this if you had only attempted 2 of the 3 questions.

My guess therefore that whereas in theory there is no such decree, in practice unless 3 questions have been substantially answered then the candidate will probably fail. The question paper quite clearly says ATTEMPT 3 and if you clearly have only attempted 2 it demonstrates
a) you can't understand instructions, or b) you are so arrogant that you decide not to follow instructions, and /or c) you don't have the WIDTH of knowledge required and my just have fallen lucky with the two questions. Whichever you hardly endear yourself, so when there is any subjective judgement to be made it is unlikely to be in your favour.

I think the examiners would be rather more lenient with someone who had done 2 pretty reasonable questions but had not been too rigouress about time management and then had either to give a very sketchy answer to the whole or only had time for the first part of that third question. If however someone had answered most of 3 questions but there was one bit in each that they didn't have a clue about then provided these "bits" were only worth about 5 each, then I don't see any great problem- should be easy enough to have got in or around a pass on each even if limited to a maximum of 20 rather than 25.

Hence my guess is that it is not entirely black and white and I'd be surprised if someone whose marks exceeded 50% were failed purely because of only attempting 2, but similalry I'd be surprised if many people would be capable of passing when only being marked out of 67.7% of the available marks.

It may be that Jeremy is closer to it to me, but if you really want a definitive answer then ask it (or if can't attend get it asked for you) at the Exam Review which I expect will be held early / mid January. However the better thing to do would probably be simply to comply with the instructions!

Don't worry too much though about not being able to answer every bit of every question- provided that these bits were not where the substantial marks were of course!

PJW
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#3
Maybe a little off topic for this thread, but anyway...

Feedback, in a couple of months we'll all be moaning about the lack of it.

So, would it not be possible for the IRSE to return to us photocopies of our answer papers with, I presume, written comments in the columns down the side.

It seams like a reasonable way of providing feedback without taking up more of the time volenteered by the examiners. Or would that be giving awaytoo much of how we are marked!?
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