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GWR Signalling Practice paper
#1
Presented by a Mr Woodbridge in 1930! Useful background to GW/UK signalling practices.

J


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Le coureur
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#2
(27-05-2010, 09:00 AM)Jerry1237 Wrote: Presented by a Mr Woodbridge in 1930! Useful background to GW/UK signalling practices.

J

I cannot claim any relationship I am afraid.

As a Reading trained signal engineer though, I do need to point out that there are two ways of doing anything:
a) the GWR way,
b) the wrong way.

Certainly useful background; may not be directly relevant to today's railway but it is often useful to use such sources to gain an oberview. As a professional siignal engineers delight in complexity which grows over time- it is often easier to see the wood for the trees by going back in time when things were more basic and simple.

PJW
PJW
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#3
(28-05-2010, 09:31 PM)PJW Wrote:
(27-05-2010, 09:00 AM)Jerry1237 Wrote: Presented by a Mr Woodbridge in 1930! Useful background to GW/UK signalling practices.

J

I cannot claim any relationship I am afraid.
As a Reading trained signal engineer though, I do need to point out that there are two ways of doing anything:
a) the GWR way
b) the wrong way

PJW

Indeed, as Sarah pointed out from watching too much Thomas the Tank Engine with the next generation of GW signal engineers, that phrase is (correctly) used in this episode.

Remember, also, that there are 10 types of people. Those who understand binary, and those who don't.
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#4
(28-05-2010, 09:56 PM)Peter Wrote: Indeed, as Sarah pointed out from watching too much Thomas the Tank Engine with the next generation of GW signal engineers, that phrase is (correctly) used in this episode.

There is a lot to be learnt from the proper Rev Awdrey books, because he really knew his railways and kept things plausible and faithful to railway operatons; the more modern ones however.....

Just like your wife, my sister picked up quite a lot when my nephews were young boys. She is certainly convinced that they learnt their colours and numbers from those books. It was fortunate that she had the foresight to have given them both names of featured engines or there might have been trouble!
However only one of them is named after a GWR engine (and it isn't "Duck")......
PJW
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#5
(28-05-2010, 09:31 PM)PJW Wrote:
(27-05-2010, 09:00 AM)Jerry1237 Wrote: Useful background to GW/UK signalling practices.


Certainly useful background; may not be directly relevant to today's railway but it is often useful to use such sources to gain an oberview. As a professional siignal engineers delight in complexity which grows over time- it is often easier to see the wood for the trees by going back in time when things were more basic and simple.

And not directly relevant to my day job, being a comms engineer and now on signalling control, not signalling (subtle difference here, as my signals colleagues keep reminding me).

Reading Ye Olde Scrolles when things were simpler is something I have done in the past. I found understanding rotating induction machines and other three phase theory much easier to learn once I had looked up Teslas' orginal work (in English!).

This GWR paper I found useful to understand some even quite basic things - don't laugh - I did not really know what a locking table is, thats never been part of my job, past or present. Now I have an overview. So a useful reading.

--
Nick
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